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China

WHAT'S NEXT?: Any disruption in economic activity between China and the United States will necessarily affect other Asian and world economies. How China handles Donald Trump's administration, its relationship with Russia and develops its leadership ambitions will be key areas to watch intently in the coming years.

  • [New] Not only would the Chinese economy exceed that of the U.S., but China could use its national champions to shut the U.S. out of critical technology areas and become the world's dominant military power. 19FortyFive
  • [New] China has majority fishing rights in Kiribati and when foreign minister Wang Yi visits Kiribati this week it is widely expected that a series of fisheries deals will be signed. The Guardian
  • [New] We do not expect to see a rapid change in the Australian government's tough stance against China because the Labor Party believes the ideological differences between China and Australia are huge. New Delhi Times
  • [New] China has a crucial rule to play within multilateral institutions in confronting many of the challenges currently facing the world, including threats to international peace and security, instability in the global economic system, inequality, climate change and more. The Guardian
  • [New] China will adhere to open regionalism and join hands with its trading partners in the Asia-Pacific region for a shared future. Ecns.cn
  • [New] China is probably not ready to take a risk of an invasion with current force levels and capabilities in terms of attacking Taiwan. The New York Times
  • [New] The U.S. and China are the world's two great powers, and the economic cost to Business will be far greater if a future crisis between them demands action. Edelman
  • [New] Countries in the Asia Pacific region, including China, Japan, India, Australia, and places in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands, would see the worst losses with unchecked climate change: $96 trillion by 2070. Grist
  • [New] China and Taiwan are left guessing if - and to what extent - the U.S. will be involved in any China-Taiwan conflict. The Conversation
  • [New] Some parallels have been drawn between Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the threat that Taiwan faces from China, its much larger, nuclear-armed neighbor. The Washington Post
  • [New] Lockdowns in China are having greater impact on global supply chains than the war in Ukraine and will be felt even after they are lifted. ESM Magazine
  • [New] Many analysts expect China's economy to shrink in the second quarter, even if the overall COVID situation across China and economic activity has improved this month compared with April. Global Banking & Finance Review
  • [New] The China Iron and Steel Association backed a leaked draft earlier last year that proposed a peaking target by 2025 and emissions reductions of 30% by 2030. China Dialogue
  • [New] Japan has adopted a more proactive its foreign policy since Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which triggered a deep alarm that has accelerated Japan's ongoing debate over defense and security policies amid China's growing territorial threat. Washington Post
  • [New] Japanese security experts estimate that China has 1,900 short and medium-range missiles that can reach Japan, a threat that the Japanese government is considering adopting a counter-strike capability to deter. Asia Times
  • [New] If Quad's raison d'etre is to strengthen and project unity among its members facing a common challenge from the hegemonic and confrontationist China, the war in Ukraine and the ill-advised US moves to put diplomatic pressure on India to condemn the Russian invasion were a clear negative. Hindustan Times
  • [New] In East China Sea and South China Sea, the Japan and the United States will closely cooperate on responding to China-related issue, including human rights. The White House
  • [New] European leaders should not lose sight of the longer term relationship, and nor should they risk pushing Russia into a permanent alliance with China. The Telegraph
  • [New] The Chinese Communist Party has staked its legitimacy on continued economic growth and prosperity, and is likely to be far more sensitive than Russia to economic disruptions. The Pioneer
  • [New] Preventing an invasion of Taiwan by China, nuclear war on the Korean peninsula, annihilation of Israel by Iran, state sponsored terror, and Russian expansion will continue as top foreign policy priorities. R "Ray" Wang - A Software Insider's Point of View
  • [New] China, for its part, will seize the opportunities left by a US diplomatic leadership vacuum in Asia. East Asia Forum
  • China is only at risk of Western sanctions if it were to violate the U.S. and E.U. restrictions on Russia. Institutional Investor
  • In the last week of February, net inflows into Chinese equity funds dropped to $890 million from $1.2 billion a week before as investors started to evaluate whether Western sanctions on Russia might be extended to China. Institutional Investor

Last updated: 27 May 2022


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